It is with great sadness that we mourn the loss of former Psychologists Protection Society Trust Chairman Dr Douglas McFadzean.  He passed away at home in Stirling, Scotland on Thursday 28th June 2018.

Douglas was one of NHS Scotland’s most experienced counsellors in primary care and was formerly the Executive Director of the professional body COSCA – “Counselling & Psychotherapy in Scotland”.  Dr McFadzean was a member of The Psychologists Protection Society for several decades before joining the Board in 2010 to help provide assistance to fellow professionals who find themselves in difficulties.  He served as Chairman for just over a year.

PPS Services Director Ewan Murray said “In 2010 my father, PPS founder Sandy Murray decided to turn PPS into a not-for-profit Trust.  Dr McFadzean was his first choice as a Trustee, as he knew he would bring wisdom, strength and humour to the role.  Sandy was very pleased when Douglas became Chairman, overseeing the organisation’s transition into a not-for-profit Trust. We all came to appreciate Dr McFadzean’s valuable input during his tenure and he remained in contact after his retirement to provide sage advice when needed.  I will remember him fondly”.

Dr McFadzean is survived by his wife Christina and two children.

How “private” is your practice in cyberspace? Are you tech ready? hosted by our second speaker – Catherine Knibbs ... See MoreSee Less

How “private” is your practice in cyberspace? Are you tech ready? hosted by our second speaker – Catherine Knibbs

Naming and shaming therapists: Protecting the public or harming therapy? hosted by our first speaker – Philip Cox ... See MoreSee Less

Naming and shaming therapists: Protecting the public or harming therapy? hosted by our first speaker – Philip Cox

2 weeks ago

Psychologists Protection Society

Gillian and Debbie are ready to welcome tonights delegates! ... See MoreSee Less

Gillian and Debbie are ready to welcome tonights delegates!

 

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The PPS office is closed on Friday as we are holding our AGM and CPD event in Manchester. Urgent enquiries should be made to enquiries@ppstrust.org Interested in joining us online or in person? Visit www.ppstrust.org/manchester for more information ... See MoreSee Less

The PPS office is closed on Friday as we are holding our AGM and CPD event in Manchester.  Urgent enquiries should be made to enquiries@ppstrust.org   Interested in joining us online or in person? Visit www.ppstrust.org/manchester for more information

Have you signed up for our free online CPD event - Naming and shaming therapists: Protecting the public or harming therapy? - Dr Philip Cox

All the key professional registration bodies report an increase in the number of formal complaints. One response has been to update codes of ethics to protect the public from unethical and incompetent practices. It may surprise therapists to learn that irrespective of a client’s presenting issue, the therapeutic modality applied or practice context within the Western world, around 10% of people attending therapy report experiencing their therapy as harmful. The figure increases for marginalised groups and individuals. The figure for therapists reporting on their personal therapy is 27% to 40%. This presentation explores whether the new codes of ethics intended to limit harm actually risk engendering harm.

An essential aspect of ethics is to safeguard clients from harm that may have occurred from attending therapy. In a profession that is inherent with risks because we work in-relation-with-others, therapists who seem not to succeed in meeting the delicate balance between doing good work vs. poorer work can become enmeshed in quasi-legal complaint procedures. The culture of publicly ‘naming and shaming’ therapists is having an unintended outcome because the public process means an important debate around this sensitive topic risks being silenced. It seems the policy of naming and shaming may itself contribute to further difficulties and anxiety, and so may engender defensive practices and more complaints. This presentation suggests the awareness, discussion and management of unintended harm signals good and ethically-grounded practice, rather than poor clinical practice.

www.ppstrust.org/manchester
... See MoreSee Less

Have you signed up for our free online CPD event - Naming and shaming therapists: Protecting the public or harming therapy? - Dr Philip CoxAll the key professional registration bodies report an increase in the number of formal complaints. One response has been to update codes of ethics to protect the public from unethical and incompetent practices. It may surprise therapists to learn that irrespective of a client’s presenting issue, the therapeutic modality applied or practice context within the Western world, around 10% of people attending therapy report experiencing their therapy as harmful. The figure increases for marginalised groups and individuals. The figure for therapists reporting on their personal therapy is 27% to 40%. This presentation explores whether the new codes of ethics intended to limit harm actually risk engendering harm.An essential aspect of ethics is to safeguard clients from harm that may have occurred from attending therapy. In a profession that is inherent with risks because we work in-relation-with-others, therapists who seem not to succeed in meeting the delicate balance between doing good work vs. poorer work can become enmeshed in quasi-legal complaint procedures. The culture of publicly ‘naming and shaming’ therapists is having an unintended outcome because the public process means an important debate around this sensitive topic risks being silenced. It seems the policy of naming and shaming may itself contribute to further difficulties and anxiety, and so may engender defensive practices and more complaints. This presentation suggests the awareness, discussion and management of unintended harm signals good and ethically-grounded practice, rather than poor clinical practice.https://www.ppstrust.org/manchester

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Psychologists Protection Society and PPS are the trading names for the Psychologists Protection Society Trust (PPST) which is an Introducer Appointed Representative of SWIM Ltd. All insurance policies are arranged and administered by Psychologists Protection Services Ltd (PPS Ltd) which is an Appointed Representative of SWIM Ltd. SWIM Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

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